Tag: asylum seekers

Screenshot 2024-05-17 at 17.41.31
Immigration CommitteeProjects

‘Breakfast, Walk and Learn British History’ project starts

‘Have Breakfast and Learn British History’ project, which we will realise with funding from Greater London Authority, starts this month. This activity, which is implemented within the scope of ‘Community Support and Integration Project’, includes asylum seekers, refugees and migrants and will start in August 2023.

 

Welcome to the ‘Breakfast, Walk and Learn British History’ project, a transformative initiative under the GLA Building Strong Communities Programme. 

 

Our goal is to provide asylum seekers, refugees, and immigrants in Greater London, who face financial hardship and social isolation due to the high cost of living, with an enriching and inclusive experience.

 Project Ambition: The overarching ambition of this project is to support and integrate asylum seekers and refugees in Greater London, empowering them to overcome challenges associated with social isolation and financial constraints. We aim to create a warm and welcoming environment in central London, where participants can have a nutritious breakfast, engage in social interactions with their peers, and delve into the rich tapestry of British history. By fostering a sense of community and enhancing their understanding of the country they now call home, we aspire to facilitate personal and social development among the participants.

 Significance to Our Organization: At our organization, we believe in providing equal opportunities for personal growth and social development to all members of society, regardless of their backgrounds or circumstances. We recognize that asylum seekers and refugees often face unique hardships when adapting to a new culture, language, and way of life. Through this project, we aim to mitigate some of their challenges by offering a safe, inclusive, and educational space for learning and social connection.

 Inspiration and Development: The idea for “Breakfast, Walk and Learn British History” originated from conversations with members of the local immigrant communities who expressed their desire for more opportunities to socialize and learn about their new home. Financial constraints often hinder asylum seekers and refugees from participating in regular activities, leading to increased feelings of loneliness and isolation. We identified the need for an accessible and low-cost initiative that brings people together and fosters a sense of community.

 

 Project Activities: The “Breakfast, Walk, and Learn British History” project will unfold over ten months and will consist of the following activities:

 1. Monthly 2-hour Breakfast Sessions and Community Gathering: These sessions will provide participants with a nutritious breakfast and a welcoming environment for socializing and connecting with others.

 2. Monthly 3-hour Talk, Regular Guided Walks in the Local Area, and Learning Sessions about British History: Engaging and interactive sessions will delve into the historical, cultural, and social aspects of Britain, fostering curiosity and encouraging active participation. Participants will have the opportunity to explore their surroundings, engage in physical activity, and connect with nature.

 

  Project Timeline:

August 2023:

  • Date: Last Saturday of the month (August 26th)
  • Time: 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
  • Venue: HRS Headquarter @ Trafalgar Square

September 2023:

  • Date: Last Saturday of the month (September 30th)
  • Time: 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
  • Venue: HRS Headquarter @ Trafalgar Square

October 2023:

  • Date: Last Saturday of the month (October 28th)
  • Time: 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
  • Venue: HRS Headquarter @ Trafalgar Square

And so on for the next 7 months until June 2024, following the same pattern of the last Saturday of every month.

May 2024:

  • Date: Last Saturday of the month (May 25th)
  • Time: 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
  • Venue: HRS Headquarter @ Trafalgar Square

 

Please note that the dates are subject to adjustments based on public holidays or unforeseen circumstances. The project will run for a total of 10 months, concluding in May 2024, providing consistent opportunities for asylum seekers, refugees, and immigrants to benefit from this enriching experience and support their integration into the Greater London community.

 Join us on this journey of empowerment and integration! Together, we can build stronger communities and foster a sense of belonging for all individuals in Greater London. Let’s make a positive impact on the lives of those who need it the most.

 

 Project Registration: “Breakfast, Walk and Learn British History”

 

Who can apply?

 You may be eligible to participate in the “Breakfast, Walk and Learn British History” project if the following criteria apply:

 

  • Residency in London: Applicants must be residents of Greater London and able to provide valid address proof as evidence of their London residence.

 

  • Immigrant Status: Individuals with immigrant status, including dependents, asylum seekers, refugees, visa holders, or those with other approved pathways, are welcome to apply.

Register Now

hrs-basketball-school-immigrant-refugee-youth
Immigration CommitteeProjects

Hoops for Hope: Basketball school for immigrant and refugee youth begins

 

Our free basketball school we organised with the aim of making the lives of immigrant and refugee youth easier begins. The basketball school, which we initiated in order to facilitate the lives of migrant and refugee youth and contribute to their adaptation to the country, is starting. ‘Hoops for Hope: Empowering Refugee and Immigrant Youth Through Basketball’, we will provide basketball courses to 100 immigrant youth living in London for 10 months.

 

The project will start in July 2023 and end in May 2024, during which time participating young people will receive basketball training at least twice a month. 2-day basketball camp will be organised during the Human Rights week in December. All trainees will be offered meals on training days. In addition, travelling expenses and sportswear will be provided for a certain number of students who cannot afford it.

Hoops for Hope: Empowering Refugee and Immigrant Youth Through Basketball is a new project aimed at supporting vulnerable and disadvantaged youth immigrants living in Greater London. Our focus is on providing basketball sessions that will help them to overcome barriers to accessing relevant services, reducing social isolation, and improving their physical and mental well-being.

We have extensive experience working with immigrant communities and have observed that many youth immigrants are struggling with a lack of social interaction and sports activities, resulting in social isolation and health problems. Many of them are also facing financial constraints or a lack of connection with their community, which limits their ability to access relevant services and opportunities.

We have been helping vulnerable and poor asylum seekers and immigrants who contacted us to seek help upon their advocacy, community and social needs, and legal process. We observe that many immigrant youth are struggling with a lack of social interaction and sports activities. As a result, many are experiencing social isolation and health problems. We are receiving inquiries from their parents who would like to have opportunities for engaging in social activities such as sports and social gathering.

The project will run for 10 months starting in July 2023 and will consist of supervised basketball sessions and two intensive basketball camps during refugee and human rights weeks. Our focus is on serving youth immigrants from Greater London, especially those living in highly populated, diverse, deprived, and multi-religious parts of Enfield, Westminster, Haringey, Harrow, Barnet, and Brent.

The beneficiaries of our project will be youth immigrants who are facing social and economic challenges, including a lack of access to relevant services and opportunities for social interaction and sports activities. By participating in our basketball sessions, these youth immigrants will have the opportunity to improve their physical and mental well-being, make friends, and become more engaged with their local community.

The impact of our project will be significant, as it will help to reduce existing structural inequalities and future social issues for immigrant communities. By providing a safe and supportive environment for youth immigrants to participate in basketball, we aim to improve their self-esteem, confidence, and social skills, which will have positive ripple effects in their personal and professional lives.

Through this project, we also aim to promote social inclusion and foster a sense of community among youth immigrants living in Greater London. By connecting them with each other and with local resources, we hope to help them feel more integrated and supported, thus contributing to a more cohesive and resilient society.

 

Project Registration: “Hoops for Hope: Empowering Immigrant Youth Through Basketball

 

Register Now

 

 

 

 

court-of-appeal-asylum-seekers-rwanda-illegal
Articles & StatementsImmigration Committee

Court of Appeal: Plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda is illegal

Court of Appeal, reviewing the Supreme Court’s judgement, ruled that the plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda was illegal. The UK Court of Appeal has ruled that it is illegal to send illegal asylum seekers to Rwanda. Two of the three judges ruled in favour of this, while the other defended the Supreme Court’s ruling that Rwanda is a safe third country.

In December 2022, the Supreme Court ruled that the government’s plan to send some asylum seekers to Rwanda without assessing their asylum applications was lawful.

The Court of Appeal overturned the previous ruling on 29 June, ruling that sending asylum seekers to Rwanda was unlawful unless the country’s asylum system was changed, the BBC reported.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak commented after the judgement: “While I respect the court, I fundamentally disagree with its conclusions. Rwanda is a safe country. The Supreme Court has recognised this. UNHCR has its own refugee plan for Libyan refugees in Rwanda. We will now ask for permission to appeal this decision.”

In the coming process, the ministers are expected to appeal the judgement at the Supreme Court.

In its judgement, the Court of Appeal said there was a “serious risk” that if the asylum seekers were sent to Rwanda, they would be returned to their home country and face persecution and ill-treatment there. Rwanda was thus ruled not to be a safe third country.

Supporters of the appeal against the Supreme Court ruling include the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), human rights lawyers, civil society organisations and a group of asylum seekers.

UNHCR, which attended the hearing, said Rwanda had committed various human rights violations against asylum seekers within its borders. These include forced return to countries where they are at risk, deportation and arbitrary detention.

Ten asylum seekers from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Vietnam, Sudan and Albania who crossed the English Channel in small boats from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Vietnam, Sudan and Albania were among those who, together with the charity Asylum Aid, appealed the Supreme Court ruling.

Asylum Aid said the latest judgement ‘confirms the rule of law and the importance of justice’. “We are pleased that the court has ruled that the deportation process in Rwanda was unlawful on security grounds,” said Tessa Gregory, partner at law firm Leigh Day, which represented Asylum Aid. The human rights organisation Freedom From Torture called the ruling “a victory for reason and compassion”.

The Rwandan government argued that it was “one of the safest countries in the world” and was known for its “exemplary treatment of refugees”.

The judges who delivered the judgement said they agreed that the Rwandan government had given these assurances ‘in good faith’.

Community Fund provides grant for our project on refugees
EducationProjects

Community Fund provides grant for our project on refugees

The Community Foundation has recently accepted to grant our new project titled ‘Supporting Refugees and Migrants through Human Rights Workshops’. We are thrilled to announce that the Community Foundation has recently approved a grant to support our project titled “Supporting Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Migrants through Human Rights Workshops.”

The project’s primary objective is to provide human rights workshops to refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants. The workshops will be delivered by human rights experts and will cover topics such as:
·      An overview of human rights laws and conventions
·      Discrimination and how to combat it
·      Accessing healthcare, education, and employment
·      Understanding and navigating the legal system
·      How to advocate for your rights

The workshops will be delivered over a period of 10 months starting June 2023. Each workshop will last for two hours and will be delivered by Human rights experts.

The project will also include a series of social events, including cultural activities and networking opportunities, which will enable participants to build relationships with other refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants and reduce their social isolation.

The grant from Community Foundation will play a pivotal role in supporting the successful execution of this project. The funds will be utilized to secure experienced trainers and facilitators who specialize in human rights, migration issues, and community integration. Additionally, the grant will cover the costs associated with workshop materials, venue rentals, interpretation services, and other necessary resources. This support will ensure that the workshops are accessible, informative, and impactful for the participants.

We extend our sincere appreciation to all our donors and supporters whose contributions have made this grant possible. Your generosity and commitment to making a difference in the lives of others is truly inspiring. Together, we are creating a community where everyone has the opportunity to thrive and build a brighter future.

We invite you to stay connected with the progress of this project and other initiatives of HRS. Follow our social media channels and visit our website for updates, success stories, and opportunities to get involved.

Together, let us continue to work towards a more inclusive and just society.

exhibition-in-exile-london-street-asylum seekers
EventsImmigration Committee

‘Exhibition in Exile’ in the most famous streets of London

20 JUNE 2022/LONDON

While the British government was planning to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda, we organised a travelling exhibition at the famous London landmarks to remind the public of the difficulties refugees face on World Refugee Day, on the 20th of June.

While the decision to send asylum seekers to Rwanda was an extensive discussion in the British Parliament, on the occasion of World Refugee Day, on the 20th of June, we organised an exhibition known as the ‘Exhibition in Exile’ of cartoons drawn by world-renowned artists to draw attention to refugee problems. It was a travelling exhibition at famous London landmarks to remind the public of the difficulties refugees face.

The exhibition hosted a selection of the 120 best cartoons selected initially from among 1,200 submissions to a global cartoon contest organised by KYM (Kimse Yok Mu) in 2016. In addition to these cartoons, the cartoon was carried by 25 volunteers, most of whom were also refugees, with successful refugee stories to raise awareness. We moved the cartoon through the British Parliament, Parliament Square, Victoria Tower Garden, and Westminster Bridge.

 

One of the cartoons in the exhibition was by Oleksiy Kustovski that describes how refugees travel thousands of miles alone, carrying their whole lives in a small suitcase. It is sometimes a mother and child, sometimes an unaccompanied child or family, who are fleeing to safety from the dangers of their birth country.

Xavier Bonilla drew the lives lost at sea while fleeing to safety. People are desperately getting into the dangerous waters despite not knowing how to swim, and sometimes the weather conditions or pushbacks don’t let them continue their journey. Only a small number of people survive in a sinking dinghy.

When we told the people who viewed the exhibition what difficulties a refugee went through, we immediately met with their support and their interest became an absolute source of motivation for our new projects.